'ICE GIANTS AND ASTEROIDS’ - ADVANCE INFORMATION FOR OBSERVERS

Charterhouse Observatory, 19:00  Saturday 5th October 2013

 

1) Asteroids and Astrophotography

 Below are details and coordinates for some asteroids visible September to October 2013. Try spotting or even imaging these objects and their position in the sky over a period of a few weeks. We will try and image some or all of them on 5th October. They are: 3 Juno, 7 Iris, 20 Massalia and 324 Bamberga. All are larger asteroids and lie in the Main Belt.

Asteroid

Discovery year

Discovered by

Mean distance from Sun (AU)

Diameter (km)

3 Juno

1804

K. L. Harding

2.672

320×267×200

7 Iris

1847

J. R. Hind

2.385

199.8 ± 10

20   Massalia

1852

A. de Gasparis

2.408

160×145×130 

324   Bamberga

1892

J. Palisa

2.683

229.4 ± 7.4

                                                                                              Source: Wikipedia 

Asteroid 20 Massalia at opposition, Friday 1st November 2013

 

20 Massalia is big and fairly bright. It is an S-type asteroid, meaning it is mainly silicaceous, or made of a lot of silicon. It is also the largest member of the Massalia family of asteroids, with a diameter of 160×145×130 km. The other family members, which are much smaller, are pieces blown off Massalia by an impact event.

 Ephemerides:                   RA                             Dec                     Constellation                  Visual 

                                    h      m      sec               °      '      "                                                Magnitude

 

Sept.    28                    2     49     12.7            +16   13   23               Aries                             9.8

Oct.       8                    2     44     53.4            +15   50   02               Aries                              9.5

Oct.     18                    2     37     47.5            +15   13   04               Aries                              9.3

Oct.     28                    2     28     44.5            +14   25   31               Aries                              8.9

Nov.      7                    2     18     58.8            +13   32   59               Aries                              9.0

Nov.    17                    2     09     59.9            +12   43   11               Aries                              9.2

Nov.    27                    2     03     04.2            +12   03   33               Aries                              9.4

Dec.      7                    1     59     02.7            +11   39   34               Aries                              9.7

                                                       Source: ‘The Handbook of the British Astronomical Association’

 

To locate and follow Massalia, see the finder charts at: http://in-the-sky.org/news.php?id=20131101_15_100

 

 Asteroid 7 Iris

7 Iris is the fourth brightest object in the asteroid belt. It is classified as an S-type asteroid, with a stony composition.

Ephemerides:                   RA                             Dec                      Constellation               Visual 

                                     h      m      sec               °      '      "                                              Magnitude

 

Sept.    28                    21   04    46.5                -7   29   51               Aquarius                        8.7

Oct.       8                     21   06    14.8                -7   51   34               Aquarius                        8.8

Oct.     18                     21   11    08.5                -7   59   52               Aquarius                        9.0

Oct.     28                     21   19    06.6                -7   53   39               Aquarius                        9.2

Nov.      7                     21   29    45.8                -7   32   24               Aquarius                        9.3

Nov.    17                     21   42    42.4                -6   56   03               Aquarius                        9.4

Nov.    27                     21   57    32.5                -6   05   10               Aquarius                        9.5

Dec.      7                     22   13    57.4                -5   00   21               Aquarius                        9.6 

Source: ‘The Handbook of the British Astronomical Association’

 To locate and follow Iris, see the finder charts at: http://in-the-sky.org/news.php?id=20130816_15_100

 

Asteroid 3 Juno

3 Juno was the third asteroid discovered in the Minor Planet Center catalogue system, and is one of the two largest stony (S-type) asteroids. It is estimated to contain 1% of the total mass of the asteroid belt.

Ephemerides:                   RA                             Dec                      Constellation              Visual 

                                    h      m      sec              °      '      "                                               Magnitude

 

Sept.    28                    20    16    42.9            -11   50   52                Capricornus                   9.6

Oct.       8                     20    20    06.5            -12   44   20                Capricornus                   9.5

Oct.      18                    20    26    05.6            -13   24   30                Capricornus                   9.3

Oct.      28                    20    34    23.8            -13   50   57                Capricornus                   8.9

Nov.       7                    20    44    44.8            -14   03   36                Capricornus                   9.0 

Source: ‘The Handbook of the British Astronomical Association’

 To locate and follow Juno, see the finder charts at: http://in-the-sky.org/news.php?id=20130804_15_100

 

Asteroid 324 Bamberga

324 Bamberga was of the last large (diameter over 200 km) asteroids discovered. Apart from the near-earth asteroid Eros, it was the last one discovered which is ever easily visible with binoculars.

 Ephemerides:                   RA                             Dec                      Constellation                 Visual 

                                     h      m      sec              °      '      "                                                Magnitude

 

Sept.    28                    22    58    10.4             +6   35   53                Pisces                             8.5

Oct.       8                    22    51    57.2             +7   11   56                Pisces                             8.8

Oct.     18                    22    49    27.5             +7   44   06                Pegasus                          9.1

Oct.     28                    22    51    00.5             +8   18   03                Pegasus                          9.3

Nov.      7                    22    56    26.9            +8   58   07                Pegasus                          9.6

Nov.    17                    23    05    22.3            +9   47   08                Pegasus                          9.8

Nov.    27                    23    17    12.7            +10   45   59                Pegasus                       10.0 

Source: ‘The Handbook of the British Astronomical Association’

To locate and follow Bamberga, see the finder charts at: http://in-the-sky.org/news.php?id=20130912_15_100

 

 

2) Some late-Summer to Autumn Deep-Sky Objects to look for

 

Constellation

Designation

Name

Type of Object

Magnitude

Andromeda

M31

Andromeda   Galaxy

Spiral galaxy

3.4

 

M32

 

Elliptical   galaxy

8.1

 

M110

 

Elliptical   galaxy

8.1

 

NGC 7662

Blue   Snowball

Planetary   nebula

8.3

Aquarius

M2

 

Globular   cluster

6.4

 

M72

 

Globular   cluster

9.3

 

M73

 

Asterism

-

 

NGC 7009

Saturn   Nebula

Planetary   nebula

8.3

 

NGC 7293

Helix   Nebula

Planetary   nebula

7.3

Capricornus

M30

 

Globular   cluster

7.3

Cetus

M77

 

Galaxy

8.9

Cygnus

M29

 

Open   cluster

6.6

 

M39

 

Open   cluster

5.0

 

NGC 6826

Blinking   Planetary

Planetary   nebula

8.8

 

NGC 7026

 

Planetary   nebula

10.9

 M31_Aiglon.jpg

M31 and its satellite galaxies M32 and M110 in Andromeda

Image: Dominique Meyer/Aiglon College

Draco

NGC 6543

Cat’s Eye   Nebula

Planetary   nebula

8.1

Lyra

M57

Ring   Nebula

Planetary   nebula

8.8

Pegasus

M15

 

Globular   cluster

6.0

Perseus

M34

 

Open   cluster

5.2

 

M76

Little   Dumbbell Nebula

Planetary   nebula

10.1

 

NGC 869

Sword   Handle

Double   star cluster

Open   cluster

 

 

NGC 884

Open   cluster

 

Pisces

M74

 

Spiral   galaxy

9.4

Sagitta

M71

 

Globular   cluster

8.3

Triangulum

M33

Pinwheel   galaxy

Spiral   galaxy

5.7

Vulpecula

M27

Dumbbell   Nebula

Planetary   nebula

7.3

Source: ‘Philip’s Deep Sky Observer’s Guide’ – Neil Bone (Philip’s, 2004)

Voyager_at_Uranus.jpg                                     768px-Triton_moon_mosaic_Voyager_2_large.jpg

Left: Artist's impression of Voyager 2 at Uranus in 1986            Right: The icy surface of Neptune's largest moon, Triton.

Images: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

3) Locating The Ice Giants – Uranus & Neptune

For finder charts visit:

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/highlights/Uranus-and-Neptune-in-2013-190064991.html

http://media.skyandtelescope.com/documents/Uranus-Neptune-2013.pdf

You can also download pdf charts:           http://www.in-the-sky.org

 

Happy hunting!

Compiled by Chris Starr